Canada one step closer to legalizing Witchcraft Sorcery and Fortune Telling

According to a Lucifer’s search engine Google, several articles state it was legalized back in June 2017!

Some Warlocks are trying to do the same here in America. There is a bill sitting idle to make Magic a National Treasure!

Will Young Think Pol – If you have ever dressed as Harry Potter or the Wicked Witch of the East for Halloween in Canada, you have committed a criminal offense.

Section 365 of Canada’s criminal code currently makes it an offense to pretend to practice witchcraft, sorcery, fortune telling, or occult.

365 Every one who fraudulently

(a) pretends to exercise or to use any kind of witchcraft, sorcery, enchantment or conjuration,

(b) undertakes, for a consideration, to tell fortunes, or

(c) pretends from his skill in or knowledge of an occult or crafty science to discover where or in what manner anything that is supposed to have been stolen or lost may be found,

is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

But the House of Commons recently passed Bill C-51 that repeals section 365 from the criminal code, bringing it a step close to becoming the law of the land.

According to experts, there are very good reasons for removing such archaic provisions from the criminal code.

“One of the provisions that’s being removed in this bill is pretending to practice witchcraft,”Steve Coughlan, a professor at Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, told the House of Commons committee that studied the bill. “It probably hadn’t been prosecuted for 30 or 40 years, and about six months ago, some police officer in Toronto laid that charge.”

“At some level, there’s an element of randomness as to when the lesser-known offences come up,” Prof. Coughlan added. “It’s somebody looking at the index, doing a search online, and trying to find it. It’s possible that the crown can then look at it and say, ‘You know what? That’s the wrong one.’”

The plan to repeal archaic laws from the criminal code was well received in Parliament.

“One must wonder about the existing laws regarding the practice of witchcraft, sorcery, enchantment, or conjuration” Wayne Stetski Kootenay, the NDP MP for Columbia, BC, told parliament. “In addition to the fact that it impinges on the rights of some religions, and would confuse the U.S. President who is certain that he is the target of a witch hunt, this might also hurt Harry Potter cosplayers; Dungeons and Dragons “larpers”, which I do not know much about but which my staff assure me is a thing; and others for whom sorcery is an entertainment. This is a good law to be rid of.”

But some opposition Conservative Party members were not thrilled with the idea.

“We all chuckle and laugh, but I can understand why the party of Mackenzie King would want to make legal the practice of witchcraft, sorcery, and talking with people who have passed from this world, as Mackenzie King enjoyed doing,” Peter Van Loan, the Conservative MP for York, Simcoe, Ontario, said. “The concern is, and we have all heard stories like this, that people use these kinds of fraudulent witchcraft powers to persuade people that, for example, if they put $10,000 in an envelope, which they say will be burned but they slide it under the table instead, he or she will be saved from whatever curse they say the person is under”

“These things really happen in our society, even in this day and age.” Van Loan added. “Does that provision, as it exists right now, cause any harm? No. Does it give the police an avenue or resource in the case of those particular unusual offenses? Yes, it does.”

Canada’s Senate is expected to deliberate the bill in the new year. Source: Think Pol