False Churches

This is what gives Christianity a bad name. But Jesus said the Tares will grow with the Wheat.

What is a church? This comes from dictionary.reference.com with a comment in #4 by me.

1.a building for public Christian worship.
2.public worship of God or a religious service in such a building:
to attend church regularly.
3.(sometimes initial capital letter) the whole body of Christian believers; Christendom.
4.(sometimes initial capital letter) any division of this body professing the same creed and acknowledging the same ecclesiastical authority; a Christian denomination: the Methodist Church. ( My comment; Methodist’s used to be a Godly “Church” but that is now debatable)
5.that part of the whole Christian body, or of a particular denomination, belonging to the same city, country, nation, etc.
6.a body of Christians worshipping in a particular building or constituting one congregation: She is a member of this church.
7.ecclesiastical organization, power, and affairs, as distinguished from the state: separation of church and state; The missionary went wherever the church sent him.

 

Other definitions just say “a place of worship”, “a body or organization of religious believers” but most associate a Church as being a place for Christians.

Now with the other definitions taken into context, “a place of worship”, “a body or organization of religious believers”, that would mean the places such as the church of satan (COS), and these Atheist churches are actually a religion and worship something..



The following posts are just some examples of mockery of Christianity.
 
‘Getting high on The Most High’: ‘Weird’ preacher starts ‘drunken glory’ cult where ex-addicts snort frankincense and get wasted through the power of sermon

  • Brandon Barthrop took drugs as a teenager but had a religious epiphany
  • Now he has taken over a Minneapolis crackhouse where he films YouTube sermons and takes imaginary cocaine with other former addicts
  • His mentor John Crowder is spreading the ‘drunken glory’ to Britain
  • The pair have fallen out because Crowder fears Barthrop is too ‘weird’

By Hugo Gye PUBLISHED: 06:42 EST, 19 December 2013 UPDATED: 07:35 EST, 19 December 2013

A former drug addict has helped kickstart America’s newest religious craze – a church where worshipers pretend to get high and worship God in ‘drunken glory’.

Brandon Barthrop preaches to a congregation of thousands via bizarre YouTube rants, in which he encourages followers to act drunk in order to commune with Jesus.

The charismatic religious leader insists that ‘there’s no high like The Most High’ – and he has replaced alcohol and crystal meth with snorting frankincense.

Visionary? Brandon Barthrop, a former drug addict, is now a leading member of the ‘drunken glory’ movement

Followers: He now shares a former crackhouse with a number of other addicts turned Christians

Bizarre: The worshippers pretend to ‘drink’ the Bible and snort imaginary drugs

A new documentary by Vice has lifted the lid on the world of the drunken glory movement, whose meetings are so raucous they are often confused with outrageous nights out.

The strange new ‘church’ was started in the U.S. by preacher John Crowder, but has now spread across the Atlantic to Britain.

Mr Crowder has travelled the world holding meetings at which worshippers giggle, shout and even writhe on the floor in an apparent state of intoxication

One of his most prominent converts was Mr Barthrop, who started taking drugs as a teenager due to his traumatic childhood.

He claims he was kidnapped twice by his father following a bitter custody battle between his parents, and lived in 24 different states while growing up.

The situation became so desperate that his father ended up telling police that Brandon had attacked him, in an attempt to have him arrested so he would have to stop taking drugs.

While in rehab Mr Barthrop had a religious epiphany, and he then set up Red Letter Ministries to promote his message

He took over a former crackhouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota and invited followers to move in with him and his wife Penny.

‘Mostly the people who live in our house are ex-druggies, ex-alcoholics, ex-prostitutes,’ Mrs Barthrop says – and in the documentary, many of them have the demeanour of people who are high on drugs during the preacher’s sermons.

In fact, however, the only times they take narcotics are when they snort imaginary cocaine or smoke invisible marijuana.

Mr Barthrop has also replaced his former drug habit with frankincense and ‘diamond oil’, home-made and entirely legal concoctions which he believes help bring him closer to God.

Snorting: Mr Barthrop now takes frankincense because of its bilbical associations

Smoking: One of his followers pretending to toke on a Lego figurine like a spliff

Gathering: Mr Barthrop with a number of his followers all pretending to drink and take drugs

The priest spreads his message by releasing several videos a week on YouTube, in which he rants at the camera while his followers cackle with laughter in the background.

In the Vice documentary, he is shown comparing religion to narcotics, saying: ‘If you have some really good drugs, you know you don’t keep those to yourself, you gotta find people to do them with, and we’ve found the perfect drug – getting high on Jesus.’

While Mr Barthrop’s ministry was inspired by Mr Crowder, the two have grown apart following a disagreement about the difference in their preaching.

‘They teach weird stuff,’ Mr Crowder said. ‘Like you have sex with God, like you eat gold dust to make you glow like a lightbulb.

‘I’ve just seen a lot of people get caught up in a lot of weird things, and they’ve lost their freedom.’

However, Mr Barthrop says that his former mentor is simply envious of his success, and scared of losing his position as leader of the movement.

And he insists he will not stop at YouTube videos and a modest house – in the future, he says, he wants to take over a mansion and own his own television channel.

See the Source Article for more pics and commentary.